AidSpace Blog

Category Archives: Restoration

Phase Two—The New Wing

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Looking at the seemingly endless aisles of crates at the Paul E. Garber Restoration and Storage Facility, it is not a great stretch of the imagination to picture Indiana Jones scouring these narrow labyrinths for that anonymous wooden crate housing the notorious Ark. Images of Garber bring to mind the sheer size of the Museum’s   …Continue Reading


Saving Jenny

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The Curtiss JN-4D Jenny is arguably one of the most famous aircraft designs in aviation history, at least U.S. aviation history.  Like the DC-3, the Piper Cub, the P-51 Mustang, the Boeing 707, and the F-4 Phantom, to name just a few, the Jenny remains a classic and an all-time favorite of anyone with an   …Continue Reading


Personal Connections Make the Museum Meaningful

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Confession: I used to think airplanes were boring. When I left my home in Tucson, Arizona this May to begin a summer internship at the National Air and Space Museum, I thought that air and space history had nothing to do with me. And, I must confess, I had very little interest in them, either.   …Continue Reading


Missing Something?

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Most of us have a “junk drawer” that contains, among other oddments, stray keys.  Restoration specialists working on the Douglas World Cruiser “Chicago” recently found two such strays in the aircraft: Since the “church key” (can opener) was found on top of the engine, it was probably used to open oil cans rather than refreshments   …Continue Reading


X-Ray Analysis of the Starship Enterprise

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When the National Air and Space Museum opened in 1976, the production model of the Starship Enterprise was prominently and dramatically displayed hanging at the entrance of “Life in the Universe” gallery. Later, when that gallery closed, and the starship was moved to several other locations within the museum.   Though these were dramatic displays, hanging   …Continue Reading