AidSpace Blog

Category Archives: Research

Casting Shadows on the Moon

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Much of the Moon is blanketed by a thick layer of dust, built up from the rocky surface over billions of years by the impacts of small meteorites. Hidden beneath the dust is evidence of ancient geologic activity – great volcanic eruptions, tectonic shifts in the crust, and vast deposits of once-molten material hurled outward   …Continue Reading


More than Just a Map

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You never know what you’ll uncover once you do a little digging. Museum Technician Tom Paone discovered something quite remarkable from what at first appeared to be a simple map. It is sometimes hard to believe just how much you can learn from some old pieces of paper. While searching in the Archives of the   …Continue Reading


10 Years on Mars

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For the last ten years while participating in the missions of the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, I have watched in amazement as the beauty of Mars was revealed via images associated with discoveries made by the rovers. From stark alien landscapes, to others looking vaguely familiar, to gorgeous Martian sunsets, these images have   …Continue Reading


Finding History on eBay

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One question I’m often asked as a curator is, “do you ever find anything interesting for the museum on eBay?” The answer is yes. This is the story of a particularly interesting find. When developing the aviation component of the museum’s “Time and Navigation” exhibit, I wanted to showcase the role of navigational radar in   …Continue Reading


Flying Low and Slow Over a Lava Flow

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This September, Larry Crumpler, a research colleague at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science, and I were able to fly in the back seats of two weight-shifting ultralight aircraft during a two-hour flight over the McCartys lava flow in central New Mexico. This flow is 3,000 years old and over 47 km   …Continue Reading