AidSpace Blog

Category Archives: Astronomy

Transit Authority

Posted on

On the morning of March 2, I got an excited text message from fellow astronomy educator Shelley Witte, telling me that the International Space Station (ISS) and Space Shuttle Discovery would be coming very close to transiting the Sun from our position at the National Air and Space Museum’s Public Observatory at exactly 3:08 pm.   …Continue Reading


Jumping In Tweet First

Posted on

On Saturday, March 19, I was thrilled to participate in the first ever Sun-Earth Day Tweetup organized by the NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center. It was also the first time the Smithsonian officially participated in a Tweetup. The event was a great opportunity to give twitter fans (aka “tweeps”) some face-to-face interaction with our research scientists, curators and   …Continue Reading


Ten Events of Great Significance in Space Exploration during the Twenty-first Century’s First Decade

Posted on

As the first decade of the twenty-first century comes to a close—I know that one could make the case that the first decade ended in 2009 but we had this argument during Y2K and I’m not going to rehash it here—what might we consider the ten most important events in space exploration and discovery? Everyone   …Continue Reading


Imaging the Lunar Eclipse

Posted on

I was pleasantly surprised when the clouds rolled out and the weather turned out to be favorable for the total lunar eclipse last night!  After work, I went home for a quick nap and put on layers and layers of clothing to help me brave the cold on the eve of the winter solstice.  Friends   …Continue Reading


Total Lunar Eclipse

Posted on

The Moon is one of the most easily recognized celestial objects and arguably the easiest one to observe. It is simple to view the changing phases from day to day, with your naked eyes. Binoculars or a telescope will reveal countless craters, ancient lava flows, and other intriguing lunar features. Of the handful of thrilling   …Continue Reading